Hot Cross Buns

  • Hot Cross Buns
  • Hot Cross Buns
  • Hot Cross Buns
Ranked: 204th

Rated 4.72 out of 5 based on 16 votes

Ingredients

  • 375 g white bread flour
  • 125 g wholemeal plain flour
  • 1/4 tspn salt
  • 2 tspn bread improver (optional)
  • 3 tspn dried yeast
  • 2 tspn caster sugar
  • 60 g caster sugar
  • 150 ml cold milk
  • 150 ml boiling water
  • 90 g butter, at room temperature
  • 1 x egg
  • 1 tspn mixed spice
  • 1 tspn cinnamon
  • 1 tspn nutmeg
  • 1/2 tspn mace
  • 1 tspn ground ginger
  • 1 pinch ground cloves
  • 150 g dried fruit (e.g. sultanas, raisins, currants)
  • 1/2 Tbls lemon zest
  • 1 cup hot tea (preferably lychee or earl grey)
  • 100 g plain flour
  • 125 ml water
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 Tbls caster sugar
  • 1 tspn mixed spice
  • 60 g caster sugar

Method

1. Make a cup of tea (two if you want to drink one while you cook) and add fruit. Soak up to 12 hours.
2. Add boiling water to cold milk.
3. Mix the two flours, improver, and salt in a large mixing bowl.
4. Place approximately a quarter of the flour in a bowl with the 2 tsp of caster sugar. Add the milk, then the yeast. Combine, ensuring there are no lumps. Cover the bowl with a clean tea towel and set aside in a draught-free place for around 20 mins.
5. Add the sugar, spices, and lemon zest to the remainder of the flour. (If you’re using mixed peel in your fruit mix, you can omit the lemon zest.)
6. Dice the butter and rub into the flour mixture.
7. Add the egg, then the yeast mixture. Combine.
8. Set aside for 5 minutes, covered with a tea towel.
9. Knead the dough for 10 minutes. Add a little flour or lukewarm milk as necessary to get the right consistency. (I usually need more flour, but I use a larger size egg.)
10. Set aside, covered with a dampened tea towel to rise. (Allow at least 2 hours. It can be left overnight in the fridge for up to 12 hours if you want to get a head start, but it may have a rather yeasty ale-like taste, which I rather like.)
11. Grease or line a large baking tray.
12. Drain the soaked fruit, setting aside the tea in a small saucepan.
13. When the dough had risen, knock it back and knead in the dried fruit.
14. Divide the dough into 16 pieces and shape into balls.
15. Place the buns on the baking tray, leaving room to spread (approx. an inch between them).
16. Set aside to prove for about 45 minutes.
17. Preheat the oven to 200C .
18. Mix the cross ingredients into a smooth thick paste. Fill a piping bag and pipe the crosses on. (This is easiest if you do horizontal rows, then vertical ones, rather than each bun individually.)
19. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes. (Mine in the picture were baked for 12 minutes.)
20. Make the bun wash by adding sugar and mixed spice to the leftover tea. Heat to make a thin syrup.
21. Brush the buns with the wash as soon as you have removed them from the oven.

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  • Scrumptious! Will never buy them ever again. I love the Earl Grey tea twist.

    Reply

    by Michele G on 28/03/2013, 16:59
    Michele G
  • While the recipe uses a few dishes – it was worth it. Perfect for Good Friday. The earl grey flavour is lovely.

    Reply

    by Deb Hewson on 28/03/2013, 19:59
    Deb Hewson
  • There are Hot Cross buns, and there are Hot Cross buns, this recipe is the best I have ever come across – the taste of earl grey tea adds to them a unique blend of flavours everyone looks for when wanting to bake something widespread but still different.

    Reply

    by Ina Vukic on 29/03/2013, 08:46
    Ina Vukic
  • I really like the lemon zest substituted for mixed peel and it’s definitely the most straightforward recipe I’ve come across. These are the best Good Friday hot cross buns I’ve ever had!

    Reply

    by Iosephus Mons on 29/03/2013, 08:54
    Iosephus Mons
  • Mishka they look beautiful.

    Reply

    by ANNA LINHART on 29/03/2013, 15:22
    ANNA LINHART
  • What a calorific spectacle. Mouthwateringly splendid.

    Reply

    by Geoff Mongan on 29/03/2013, 20:25
    Geoff Mongan
  • This recipe is full of promise. I hope I can do it justice. A masterpiece.

    Reply

    by Godfrey Getting on 29/03/2013, 20:38
    Godfrey Getting
  • Best I’ve tasted.

    Reply

    by Jeff Morgan on 29/03/2013, 21:30
    Jeff Morgan
  • A delicate and marvelous balance of favours that will be hard to equal. Definitely a 5 star effort.

    Reply

    by Meyrick Johnson on 29/03/2013, 22:22
    Meyrick Johnson
  • what a splendid recipe.

    Reply

    by Gourdian Ramsay on 29/03/2013, 23:34
    Gourdian Ramsay
  • magnifique. A certain starter for my next candlelight supper.

    Reply

    by Michael St George on 29/03/2013, 23:38
    Michael St George
  • I think it’s the tea and the lemon zest that makes this different. Great idea to use the left over tea and turn into a glaze.

    Reply

    by Christine Gora on 30/03/2013, 08:15
    Christine Gora
  • I too leave it out when I can, but when in a hurry or when the house is too cold or for novice bakers I would suggest bread improver is a good idea. You certainly don’t need it, but it can help! (Many people give up on baking with yeast because of bad experiences with it not rising, so I recommend it for anyone who isn’t experienced with yeast baking.)

    Reply

    by Mishka Gora on 31/03/2013, 08:56
    Mishka Gora
  • Shame I didn’t find this recipe before Easter! Will have to wait till next year now!

    Reply

    by Joe Gersh on 27/04/2013, 09:11
    Joe Gersh