Sous Vide Petuna Ocean Trout

Ranked: 179th

Rated 4.8 out of 5 based on 10 votes

Ingredients

  • 1 x fillet petuna ocean trout
  • 50 ml olive oil
  • 1/2 x large bulb fennel, trimmed and cored
  • 50 g butter, diced
  • 125 ml water
  • 1/2 tspn white wine vinegar
  • 15 x peas
  • 1/2 x piece dehydrated nori
  • 1/4 x cucumber, diced
  • 1/2 cup parsley
  • 50 ml olive oil
  • 6 x baby radish
  • 3 x baby nasturtium leaves
  • 4 x nasturtium petals

Method

Sous Vide Ocean Trout

Portion Petuna Ocean trout into 5cm x 2cm long logs, sprinkle with sea salt and rub with oil. Place in plastic wrap and wrap tightly to form a cylinder. Place into sous vide bags and compress, cook en sous vide at 43° for 20mins. Refresh in ice water.

Fennel Puree

Roughly chop fennel. Melt butter in a medium saucepan over low heat. Add fennel and cook for 20-30mins until caramelised and tender. Add small amount of water if fennel begins to stick. Transfer fennel and cooking liquid to blender and puree on high speed, adding just enough water to achieve a smooth puree. Pass through fine sieve and add vinegar and salt.

Pea and Nori Crumb

Dehydrate peas in oven at lowest temperature leaving door slightly ajar to ensure even airflow. Grind dehydrated peas and nori until a fine powder is formed.

Compressed Cucumber

Place cucumber and pinch salt into a sous vide bag and compress to high pressure. Leave for 10-15mins, then remove from bag.

Parsley Oil

Blend Parsley and oil together and allow to infuse in the fridge. Stain.

Blanched Radish

Blanch for 1 min in salted boiling water. Refresh in Ice water to retain colour.

To finish and Serve

Reheat ocean trout en sous vide at 40° for 5 mins. Reheat fennel puree and parsley oil. Slightly heat cucumber in a saucepan over the water bath heating the fish. Trim ends of cylinder of heated ocean trout and place onto plate, add a few dots of puree. Arrange Vegetables attractively and add a tsp nori crumb. Garnish with nasturtiums and serve immediately.

Sous vide cooking is a great way to cook meats and fish as it allows no room for burning or overcooking. To sous vide without a circulator, vacuum pack the food, heat a pot of water to the required temperature. Add ice cubes to maintain the temperature. The fish will retain moist and perfectly cooked. If you don’t have a vacuum sealer, use a ziplock bag with air removed.

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  • Love it!

    Reply

    by Lionel King on 11/12/2012, 12:38
    Lionel King
  • Great recipe Dylan and stunning presentation…. I wish I could present my food as beautifully as you do.
    Do you have sous vide equipment at home…. I think it would be quite challenging to sous vide the trout at 43 degrees without a professional water bath to cook in?
    When do you open your first restaurant…. perhaps on your 14th birthday? You’re ready my son!

    Reply

    by Stuart Talman on 11/12/2012, 13:13
    Stuart Talman
    • yes I feel quite understocked on equipment myself, but the snap lock bags are a great option and I have a yogurt incubator that I am going to do a temp test on and I think I can adopt it to suit …. will let you know how I get on

      Reply

      by Helen Minns on 11/12/2012, 13:51
      Helen Minns
  • Georgious! in presentation and otherwise! all round top notch!

    Reply

    by Jason Lighting on 11/12/2012, 14:06
    Jason Lighting
  • georgious! tasted wonderfull!

    Reply

    by Omar Sanchen on 11/12/2012, 14:07
    Omar Sanchen
  • Thanks so much @Stuart! unfortunately I do not have a circulator as of yet, hopefully my chrismas present! it is a nuisance without one, although this one is not so bad (20 mins). It is impossible to do pork belly or something with a lot of connective tissue, as it has to sous vide for up to days! not sure about opening a restaurant haha, but hoping to do a small pop up next year, should be great :)

    Reply

    by Dylan Carter on 11/12/2012, 14:42
    Dylan Carter
  • this is wonderfull! beutifully created!

    Reply

    by Liam Emanuel on 11/12/2012, 17:48
    Liam Emanuel
  • Are you seriously 13? Wow! Impressive. Actually, it’s impressive for someone of any age. Great stuff Dylan.

    Reply

    by Sara Y on 12/12/2012, 12:11
    Sara Y
  • thanks, it is truly is a great way of cooking! Have you tried it? :)

    Reply

    by Dylan Carter on 12/12/2012, 18:09
    Dylan Carter
    • i still love fresh produce and still cook in those ways but I just think evolution is good. Thanks, you’re too kind :)

      Reply

      by Dylan Carter on 14/12/2012, 12:37
      Dylan Carter
    • I am much the same … a wood fire is my preference and I hope to have a cobb oven soon with a smoker box …. I would also love to have a ground oven which I would prefer for slow cooking and succulent perfection … reinventing the wheel for sake of the appearance of innovation is not my style. I tried the snap lock bag but could not exclude enough air and the result was hard to duplicate in a home kitchen setting. This is a hard to attain method

      Reply

      by Helen Minns on 14/12/2012, 21:23
      Helen Minns
  • Thanks Sara, yeah haha. I don’t think I could have done anything without the restaurants being kind enough to allow me into their kitchens! :)

    Reply

    by Dylan Carter on 12/12/2012, 18:12
    Dylan Carter
  • A method and result that is hard to attain without specialised equipment. Using the ziplock bag without vaccuum exclusion is tricky and the result imperfect. I used a yogurt incubator for low temp control which was within it’s capability, but still. I was impressed with the fennel portion of the dish and had fresh forraged wild fennel that was baby tender and delicious. My garden fresh peas I was loath to dehydrate but that worked just fine and the addition of nori was a nice touch. My cucumber was perhaps a bit young and did not hold it’s shape well after cooking, but my heirloom multicoloured beets turned out a treat. The salmon was just … uninspiring. only just lifted a little by the pepper and spice of the nasturtiums

    Reply

    by Helen Minns on 14/12/2012, 21:31
    Helen Minns
  • to achieve vacuum, place into bag. heat water until simmering then submerge the bag to the zip. Seal and vacuumed. the time differs between salmon and trout also. it’s a much better result then pan cooking as it heats from all sides and is an indirect heat source. Also without a temp alteing no more than 2 degrees the result will become dry. did you do the fennel puree? It has the acidity which lifts the dish. Chef steps does a great course on mastering sous vide http://www.chefsteps.com . I have no specialised equipment such as a circulator and my fish was perfect!

    Reply

    by Dylan Carter on 14/12/2012, 22:00
    Dylan Carter
  • It is a difficult method, but when done right, it works excellently. The method is not for the appearance, but for cooking without any possibility of over cooking. Just because something is innovative doesn’t mean it is unnatural, other wise restaurants wouldn’t use it. Do you know noma? They are a super organic, seasonally driven restaurant which only sources ingredients within a 50km radius. They use this method. It’s not just ‘molecular’ chefs (a term which I hate) who use it, (btw Heston nor Ferran came up with it, it was Joan Roca) but natural chefs as well :)

    Reply

    by Dylan Carter on 14/12/2012, 22:09
    Dylan Carter
  • I must admit to feeling outclassed … a rusty stove and a sony cybershot have little to offer against these sort of offerings. It is also hard to rate a recipe that is hard to duplicate … my back to basics approach and my finances would exclude such culinary finery as a circulator that starts even on ebay at over $1k … still there is inspiration here for even such as I and I got to try something I would perhaps have never done even if my results are not to this standard .. it was fun to try

    Reply

    by Helen Minns on 14/12/2012, 22:54
    Helen Minns
  • As you can see I am poring it on, you get 2 tbs each. Why only 0.5 stars?

    Reply

    by Dylan Carter on 30/12/2012, 17:11
    Dylan Carter
    • She’s giving 0.5 stars to everyone who’s doing well in the rankings except for her friends. Ignore that rating as she has been reported and her reviews will be removed soon hopefully.

      Reply

      by Sarah Lewis on 30/12/2012, 23:19
      Sarah Lewis
  • This look amazing! Great recipe, Dylan.

    Reply

    by Sarah Lewis on 30/12/2012, 19:14
    Sarah Lewis
  • :)

    Reply

    by Dylan Carter on 31/12/2012, 09:54
    Dylan Carter
  • yeah, I it’s just easier. Love you’re dishes btw! :)

    Reply

    by Dylan Carter on 01/01/2013, 20:01
    Dylan Carter
  • radish is not used nearly enough. it is such a refreshing flavour that adds such a nice element of coolnes when needed and heat where required! love this recipe!

    Reply

    by Jennifer Howard on 16/01/2013, 15:29
    Jennifer Howard