Wholemeal Spelt Sour Dough

  • Wholemeal Spelt Sour Dough
  • Wholemeal Spelt Sour Dough
  • Wholemeal Spelt Sour Dough
  • Wholemeal Spelt Sour Dough
Ranked: 226th

Rated 4.67 out of 5 based on 18 votes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sour dough starter (lactobacillus sanfranciscensis)
  • 5 cups water
  • 3 Tbls extra virgin olive oil
  • 13 cups wholemeal spelt flour
  • 4-6 tspn salt

Method

Mix the culture, water, oil and salt in a large bowl. Gradually add flour until too stiff to mix with a wooden spoon or by hand. Turn out on a lightly floured surface and knead well, adding any remaining flour from the original recipe. When no more flour will be taken up by the dough whilst kneading it is ready for the next step.

Fold the dough into a nice uniform round and place into a container that has been very lightly wiped with olive oil (remember the round will increase in size at least by double, so make the container of a corresponding size!) and cover with a damp tea-towel, and proof in a kitchen over night, or longer in a cooler area. next morning punch it down gently, and kneed for 1-2 minutes and make into 2 large or 4 smaller loaves ( or a heap of bread and rolls as I did :) ) and proof again for 3-5 hours at kitchen temperature.

Again expect volume to double at the least. Preheat oven to 200 degrees Celsius, and bake each loaf for 20 minutes, then turn the oven down to 180 degrees Celsius for a further 20 minutes (this time will depend entirely on the size of your loaves, so check the bread after 10 minutes by tapping the bottom of the loaf with a finger tip, if it rings back with a solid thud it is perfectly done, if it doesn’t sound like a drum it may need more time). Turn out immediately onto a wire rack to cool, or get a big pile of butter and start eating whilst it is hot :)

To make the starter, if you are not as lucky as I am to have a 15 Year Old San Fransisco Starter, follow the next recipe.

Sourdough Starter Recipe

Ingredients

1 small handful (1/4 to 1/3 cup) Wholemeal Spelt flour

1 or 2 tablespoons of water

Tools & equipment

a small bowl
a towel, napkin, or other piece of cloth (not terry)
a large spoon

Directions:

In a mound of flour, make a small well and add the water.
Slowly mix the flour and the water, bringing more flour into the center of the well. The mixture will gradually transform from a paste into a small piece of dough.
Knead this small piece of dough with your fingers for about 5-8 minutes, until it becomes springy.

Place the dough in a small bowl, cover it with a damp towel, and let it sit in a warm spot for 2 or 3 days.

When it’s ready, the dough will be moist, wrinkled, and crusty. If you pull off a piece of the crust, you’ll find tiny bubbles and smell a sweet aroma.
Throw away any hardened crust. “Refresh” the remaining piece by mixing it with twice the original amount of flour and enough water to make a firm dough. Set aside as before.
After 1 or 2 days the starter will have a new, fresh look. Remove any dried dough and mix with about 1 cup of flour.
Once again, cover the bowl with a damp cloth and leave it in a warm place for another 18-12 hours.
When the starter is ready, it will appear fully risen, and a small indentation made with a finger won’t spring back.

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  • If you are gluten sensitive this is almost a perfect choice as the long ferment consumes the gluten in the spelt flour. This is the best baking smell ever … and this bread goes excellently with my potted cockles.
    You wont regret trying this amazing recipe

    Reply

    by Helen Minns on 17/12/2012, 20:55
    Helen Minns
    • Thanks Helen

      Reply

      by James Ayers on 17/12/2012, 21:21
      James Ayers
  • Yumm! Nothing better than the smell of fresh homemade bread!

    Reply

    by Renee Jaatinen on 19/12/2012, 18:19
    Renee Jaatinen
    • Especially homemade wholemeal Spelt, tis the best, thanks Renee :)

      Reply

      by James Ayers on 22/12/2012, 12:40
      James Ayers
  • Had some with the potted cockles the other night and it was to die for! I’m not a bread eater but I love this!

    Reply

    by Janette Barlow on 23/12/2012, 07:19
    Janette Barlow
    • Thanks Janette

      Reply

      by James Ayers on 23/12/2012, 08:35
      James Ayers
      • Not a problem! Can’t wait for the next time!! It is a great bread!

        Reply

        by Janette Barlow on 23/12/2012, 19:33
        Janette Barlow
  • James this bread is divine!

    Reply

    by Elizabeth Cornwall on 23/12/2012, 15:16
    Elizabeth Cornwall
  • Make it look so easy!!! Can’t wait to try this one. :)

    Reply

    by Heidy Perri on 23/12/2012, 16:31
    Heidy Perri
    • we’re just a trip down the mountian Heidy lol welcome anytime

      Reply

      by Helen Minns on 23/12/2012, 20:02
      Helen Minns
  • I love sourdough and this recipe is great!

    Reply

    by Sarah Lewis on 27/12/2012, 11:20
    Sarah Lewis
    • it is a terrific recipe … and the smell! nothing comes close to how good this smells … even the starter has a lovely rich smell

      Reply

      by Helen Minns on 27/12/2012, 11:30
      Helen Minns
  • smells and tastes very yummy :)

    Reply

    by Anne-Marie Cee on 29/12/2012, 23:25
    Anne-Marie Cee
  • the starter was a gift and at 15 yo and of the SanFranciscii strain we were blessed to get what we did …. it now lives entirly on wholemeal spelt and quite happily so …. Serrandipity played a fortuitous part in us getting hold of this amazing starter and the starter recipe is for those less able to be so advantaged, but yes unbleached would be a good choice if one were starting from scratch. I have been pilliaried in some of my recipes for using products others feel are inaccessable or hard to get so a basic starter was offered by James

    Reply

    by Helen Minns on 30/12/2012, 09:39
    Helen Minns
  • Excellent, I haven’t made my own sour dough in ages, this has inspired me to do so. Thank you.

    Reply

    by Sam James on 04/01/2013, 11:28
    Sam James
    • you wont regret it … the smell alone will feed the soul

      Reply

      by Helen Minns on 04/01/2013, 22:07
      Helen Minns
      • I was told years ago to make the started with freshly squeezed grapes. Is this how you make yours?

        Reply

        by Sam James on 05/01/2013, 16:30
        Sam James
        • James was lucky to be gifted a 15yo starter, but I think the bloom on the skin of a wine grape may have what it takes to make a starter, but without looking into it I am not sure … James included a basic starter recipe with the sour dough recipe above

          Reply

          by Helen Minns on 05/01/2013, 17:10
          Helen Minns
        • here is a good resource site … lots of options for back to basics sourdough: http://www.rejoiceinlife.com/recipes/starter.php

          Reply

          by Helen Minns on 05/01/2013, 17:13
          Helen Minns
  • Yum these look delicious !

    Reply

    by Ama Abejja on 05/01/2013, 11:58
    Ama Abejja
    • they are delicious and bread making is a soothing past time

      Reply

      by Helen Minns on 04/03/2013, 06:46
      Helen Minns
  • Oh YUM – i’ve got a sourdough starter in the fridge and this would be the perfect recipe for it! Will be giving this a go this weekend!

    Reply

    by Melissa Darr on 10/01/2013, 14:16
    Melissa Darr
  • As a native Californian, I have to say this looks every bit as good as the loaves that are so popular in San Francisco. When I start adding gluten back I am going to attempt this one! I know the long fermentation lessens the gluten from the spelt flour, but I am still being very cautious about it.

    Reply

    by Debbie Percelay on 20/05/2013, 11:40
    Debbie Percelay
  • Always looking for great bread recipes that are for gluten free diet…..

    Reply

    by Teri Lindsay on 20/05/2013, 14:29
    Teri Lindsay
  • I am a sour dough addict and this recipe looks very good. I am inspired.

    Reply

    by Tess Hudson on 20/05/2013, 23:07
    Tess Hudson